Can Dogs eat Parsley? 8 Healthy Herbs for dogs

Can Dogs eat Parsley? 8 Healthy Herbs for dogs

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Can Dogs Eat Parsley? A Quick Guide to Healthy Herbs for Dogs

Parsley is one of the most popular herbs in the world, and there’s good reason why – it tastes great, it looks great, and it has plenty of health benefits. 

Humans aren’t the only ones who can reap these benefits – our pets can as well! Here’s everything you need to know about eating parsley and other healthy herbs with your dogs. 

Parsley is commonly thought of as being a food that humans can eat but dogs can’t, but this isn’t necessarily true. While parsley doesn’t have any poisonous effects on dogs, the way that it interacts with your dog’s digestive system may make it less useful to them than you think. 

Use this quick guide to help you determine whether or not it’s safe to feed your dog parsley and other herbs and plants, including mint and rosemary!

Why Would My Dog Want to Eat Parsley

While parsley is safe for dogs to eat, it’s not necessarily good for them. 

Most types of parsley are high in Vitamin K, which can help reduce blood clotting and thin your dog’s blood. 

This is a benefit if your dog needs her blood thinned or is at risk of dangerous clots (like those who suffer from deep vein thrombosis). 

However, too much Vitamin K can cause bruising and internal bleeding, so you should be careful not to give your dog too much parsley. It’s best used as an occasional treat—never a daily addition to your dog’s diet.

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Is it Dangerous if my Dog Eats Parsley

Though parsley is safe and healthy, there are a few herbs that can be dangerous if eaten by dogs. 

If you feed your dog parsley, stick with flat-leafed parsley rather than curly leaf or Italian parsley. 

These other varieties of parsley contain high levels of apigenin, a compound in plants that gives them their distinctive aromas. 

As it turns out, apigenin is toxic to dogs and can cause vomiting, diarrhea and neurological damage. Of course, if you’re planning on adding some flavorings like garlic powder or cayenne pepper, check with your vet before you give these treats to your pup. 

Some dogs have sensitivities that could be exacerbated by added seasonings.

How Much Parsley Should I Give My Dog

You can give your dog parsley in moderation, but you should keep an eye on how he reacts. Some dogs develop diarrhea or vomiting when they eat large amounts of parsley. 

You can give your dog up to 1/4 cup per day, which is generally safe if your dog is healthy and has no known allergies. 

Dogs that suffer from stomach irritation may have a hard time digesting too much parsley at once. If you notice any kind of negative reaction, stop giving it to your dog immediately and talk with your vet about alternative ways to boost his immune system.

What Other Things Should I Know About Feeding My Dog Parsley

Feeding dogs parsley is likely safe, but there are a few considerations you should be aware of. 

For instance, it can cause gastrointestinal issues in large doses or when fed on a regular basis, so stick with an occasional treat instead of a steady diet. 

And some dogs have allergies to common food items like dairy and wheat, which could put them at risk if they eat foods containing parsley—it’s best to check with your vet before giving your dog any kind of herb, especially if you’re using it as medicine. 

Plus, keep in mind that even healthy herbs like parsley are rich in oxalates—which can be toxic to dogs—so don’t overdo it.

Is it Dangerous if my Dog Eats Parsley

Though parsley is safe and healthy, there are a few herbs that can be dangerous if eaten by dogs. 

If you feed your dog parsley, stick with flat-leafed parsley rather than curly leaf or Italian parsley. 

These other varieties of parsley contain high levels of apigenin, a compound in plants that gives them their distinctive aromas. 

As it turns out, apigenin is toxic to dogs and can cause vomiting, diarrhea and neurological damage. Of course, if you’re planning on adding some flavorings like garlic powder or cayenne pepper, check with your vet before you give these treats to your pup. 

Some dogs have sensitivities that could be exacerbated by added seasonings.

How Much Parsley Should I Give My Dog

You can give your dog parsley in moderation, but you should keep an eye on how he reacts. Some dogs develop diarrhea or vomiting when they eat large amounts of parsley. 

You can give your dog up to 1/4 cup per day, which is generally safe if your dog is healthy and has no known allergies. 

Dogs that suffer from stomach irritation may have a hard time digesting too much parsley at once. 

If you notice any kind of negative reaction, stop giving it to your dog immediately and talk with your vet about alternative ways to boost his immune system.

What Other Things Should I Know About Feeding My Dog Parsley

Feeding dogs parsley is likely safe, but there are a few considerations you should be aware of. 

For instance, it can cause gastrointestinal issues in large doses or when fed on a regular basis, so stick with an occasional treat instead of a steady diet. 

And some dogs have allergies to common food items like dairy and wheat, which could put them at risk if they eat foods containing parsley—it’s best to check with your vet before giving your dog any kind of herb, especially if you’re using it as medicine. 

Plus, keep in mind that even healthy herbs like parsley are rich in oxalates—which can be toxic to dogs—so don’t overdo it.

Is it Dangerous if my Dog Eats Parsley

While it’s possible to buy healthy dog food at most major pet stores, you can save yourself some money by growing the food yourself or buying it in bulk online. 

You’ll also save yourself some time by letting your furry friend do some of the work! 

These 8 healthy herbs for dogs are easy to grow and will help your pup live a longer, healthier life. 

Plus, if you’re new to gardening, these herbs should be at the top of your list because they are among the easiest plants to grow from seed to harvest!

Herbs can improve the health of your dog in numerous ways and should be considered an essential part of a balanced diet. 

In this article, we’ll look at eight healthy herbs for dogs and how to include them in your canine’s daily diet. 

All eight herbs on our list are natural preservatives that will help extend the shelf life of any food products you give to your dog, so you don’t have to worry about them going bad anytime soon. 

They can also be used in homemade dog treats to give your pup some much-needed variety from time to time.

 

1) Turmeric

Turmeric is a well-known ingredient in curry. It has been used for centuries to help treat digestive issues. Curcumin, a compound found in turmeric, can also help treat skin disorders like eczema and rosacea. 

Curcumin helps lower oxidative stress and inflammation—both of which can aggravate your dog’s skin condition. Your best bet is to add some to his food each day (about 1/4 teaspoon should do). 

You can also make him a tea by boiling 1⁄4 cup of water with a couple teaspoons of turmeric powder and letting it steep for 10 minutes or so. 

Let cool before giving to your dog as a beverage.

2) Rosemary

Rosemary is one of my favorite herbs. It has a bright, aromatic flavor that goes well with both savory and sweet dishes. 

And, it’s pretty!

 Not only does rosemary contain significant amounts of antioxidants (meaning it can help protect your dog from free radicals), but research suggests that rosemary might actually stimulate brain activity in dogs. 

So, if you want to boost your dog’s diet, consider adding some fresh rosemary leaves to her next meal. 

Better yet, add them to a homemade bone broth—that way you’ll also be helping your dog avoid common food sensitivities like chicken and beef that may show up in commercial foods.

3) Ginger

Ginger isn’t just good for humans—it can be great for your dog as well. This hearty root can help boost your dog’s immune system, making it better able to fight off illnesses and infections. 

Not only that, but ginger has been used in Chinese medicine for centuries to treat nausea and digestive issues like constipation. 

It also tastes great—so you can give it as a treat every once in a while! Just make sure not to overdo it; too much ginger can actually cause gastrointestinal issues in dogs who aren’t used to it. ( Read more .)

4) Parsley

Parsley is known to prevent heartworms, especially when combined with garlic. 

The leaves and stems of parsley are great for a dog’s diet because they help to detoxify and purify your pet’s blood stream. 

Parsley contains chlorophyll, which helps to flush toxins from your dog’s body as it is ingested. 

It is also an anti-inflammatory that can be used topically or taken internally as a tea.

5) Cinnamon

Cinnamon contains chromium, which is important for maintaining stable blood sugar levels. 

Cinnamon also fights bad bacteria and yeast overgrowth, improves insulin sensitivity and increases appetite. 

This herb can be used in both capsules or ground powder form to add flavor to your dog’s food. 

You can even make a tea out of cinnamon bark by boiling two teaspoons of cinnamon bark with one cup of water for 10 minutes and then straining it before serving it to your dog. 

If you’re going to use cinnamon as a daily preventative, give it at least three months for results.

6) Aloe vera

One of the best herbs for your dog is aloe vera. Made up of anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties, it’s a key antioxidant that enhances your dog’s immune system.

Benefits of aloe vera: 

  • Boosts immune system
  • Enhances healing process
  • How to administer to your dog: Apply to your dog’s skin to heal and soothe.

7) Oregano

Oregano is full of antioxidants and can help ward off infection. 

The potent smell of oregano helps to repel bugs, making it great for your dog’s skin. 

Additionally, a 2003 study published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition revealed that carvacrol — a powerful antioxidant found in oregano — may be effective against harmful bacteria like E. coli. 

Put one teaspoon of oregano powder on your pup’s food each day for best results. 

Alternatively, you can use fresh oregano leaves if you have them! 

Just be sure to throw out any leftover juice before serving it to your pet; fresh juices are extremely potent and could make your dog sick if she consumes too much at once.

8) Basil

Basil is an excellent source of manganese, a mineral your dog’s body needs to form healthy bones and joints.

It also contains vitamins A and C, which will boost your dog’s immune system by helping his body fight off bacteria and viruses. In addition, basil contains a variety of antioxidants that can help reduce inflammation in your dog’s joints.

If you plan on growing your own herb garden, be sure to grow some basil for yourself too—the leaves make an excellent source of seasoning.